To avoid disastrous sewer problems, Mr. Rooter Plumbing provides plumbing maintenance, cleaning, and complimentary inspections. Don’t call someone who will needlessly damage your lawn! Call Mr. Rooter® Plumbing for plumbing experts who will provide friendly, courteous and cost-effective services. We are available 24/7 to address all of your plumbing emergencies and will never charge overtime fees.

Eduardo is the best! I had a leaking kitchen sink and after watching YouTube I decided to try and fix it myself. I got most of the repair done but still had a small leak. I called Eduardo and he offered for me to text him a picture of the issue. I did and he was able to guide me through fixing the problem. No house call needed and no charge! He's earned my business for any future plumbing issues that I can't handle.
Tankless water heaters usually cost more to install than traditional tanks, because many homes need to be retrofitted to accommodate the new system. Tankless electric water heaters retail on average between $150 and $1,200, and tankless natural gas water heaters retail between $200 and $1,300 on average. The lower prices ($150-$250) are generally for point-of-use tankless heaters that can be installed to boost hot water in high-demand areas such as the bathroom or kitchen sink. Tankless water heaters designed to heat whole homes usually start under $300 at the low end and go up to $1,400 or more. Pricing for whole-home varies with the heater’s technology and features. Nationally, standard water heater installation costs average $360-$780, but tankless water heater installation costs may range from $400 to $1,000, depending on the work needed. Some perks of tankless water heaters are that they have nearly double the life expectancy of traditional water heaters and are generally more cost-efficient. Homeowners may be able to save $100 or more per year on their utility bills with an Energy Star approved tankless heater, depending on how much hot water they use.
“Don’t go to the Yellow Pages to find a plumber,” says Berkey’s Bill Stevens. “It’s like guessing lottery numbers. Anyone can make an appealing ad, but that doesn’t mean they are legitimate. In this industry, it’s easy for a plumber who develops a poor reputation to advertise under a different name. They come and go.” Even searching for someone online may end up being a scam using fake reviews. Instead, look for a plumber who is well-established in your community. Check the Better Business Bureau and read customer reviews at sites such as HomeAdvisor, Angie’s List, or Citysearch. Local contractors or plumbing fixture stores can also refer you to a quality plumber, according to Grady Daniel, who owns a plumbing company in Austin, Texas. “Most of these firms won’t work with bad plumbers.” Or simply ask your neighbors for a referral. A trusted plumber that consistently delivers quality service does not remain a secret for very long.

Similar to unclogging the sewer main, the Roto-Rooter technician will run a rotating mini-rooter auger machine, otherwise known as a drain snake, down the branch line. The auger will begin at the area of the clog, such as the shower drain, and run as far as the sewer main. Sometimes the snake only needs to extend as far as the nearby trap in order to unclog the line.
Another way to avoid a service call from your plumber is to make sure the outside faucets are turned off in the winter and make sure you disconnect the outside hoses. You need to shut the water off from the inside. Then, open the valve on the outside to let the water that’s in there drain out—you switch both of them to the opposite direction so one is always closed and one is always open. We have to fix tons of these in the spring mostly because people leave their outside hoses connected and they freeze up. The repair could cost $100-$200 or more. Another tip would be if you’re going away for any length of time, like on vacation, turn off your water. If on any of those days the temperature drops below freezing, have someone check in on your house. I’ve been called to homes where the family returned from vacation, and there was water flooding out from the front door.
When you book a local plumber using the Handy platform for water heater installation, to unclog a toilet, or to clean out your drains, they’ll always arrive with the equipment they’ll need to do a great job. It’s in their interest as much as it’s in yours to complete every job quickly, professionally, and efficiently. That’s why when they show up, they’ll be prepared for whatever curveballs your plumbing repairs may throw at them. When you use the Handy platform to book the best local plumbers, you’ll be asked to input a few details about the plumbing repair job. Using that information, your chosen local plumbing services provider will be able to prepare in advance and ensure they bring everything they need.

BrassCraft 1/2 in. Nominal Compression Inlet x 3/8 BrassCraft 1/2 in. Nominal Compression Inlet x 3/8 in. O.D. Compression Outlet 1/4-Turn Straight Valve controls water flow to household plumbing fixtures - faucets toilets dishwashers icemakers washing machines etc. The straight valve is most often used where the water pipe enters the room from the floor. With a 90° ...  More + Product Details Close
We are the highly experienced emergency plumber providing 24-hour plumbing services throughout Los Angeles, Orange County and surrounding area in California. Our professional plumbing technicians are experts at all things plumbing, and we take pride in nurturing home-grown plumbers through our in-house training program. Take a look at our service areas.  No local plumbing company can beat our service or our coverage area.
Wooden pipes were used in London and elsewhere during the 16th and 17th centuries. The pipes were hollowed-out logs, which were tapered at the end with a small hole in which the water would pass through.[16] The multiple pipes were then sealed together with hot animal fat. They were often used in Philadelphia,[17] Boston, and Montreal in the 1800s, and built-up wooden tubes were widely used in the USA during the 20th century. These pipes, used in place of corrugated iron or reinforced concrete pipes, were made of sections cut from short lengths of wood. Locking of adjacent rings with hardwood dowel pins produced a flexible structure. About 100,000 feet of these wooden pipes were installed during WW2 in drainage culverts, storm sewers and conduits, under highways and at army camps, naval stations, airfields and ordnance plants.
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