I used Go Green Express Home Services for a minor plastic pipe repair under my kitchen sink...The worker did a great job fixing this minor pipe plastic pipe repair( my original pipe was too short and he needed to extended the pipe and then reconnect). It took him less than 10 minutes to fix. I was first quoted $125 +tax but when the worker went to his truck and spoke to whoever he spoke to at the office, the price rose to $155.10 +tax for a total of $167.10...I thought that was a little too high. Will I use this company again, I Don't Know. It would be helpful if they would have a set price list for jobs (minor repairs, Major repairs etc...), then you as the consumer can see beforehand what the cost maybe and work from there with the company. Minor repairs, Major repairs this company should at least have a set-price list. ..The worker was great and efficient and did a good job on the repair but their prices are a bit costly. And yes, I did write this in their review.
My kitchen sink clogged up late Sunday and I was frantically calling plumbers that were supposedly open for service late on Sunday.  Out of the ten plumbers that were called, only two answered their phone and  and was glad Edward was one of them. He was courteous and professional. He wasn't able to fit me in Sunday night, I totally understood, but was bale to fit me in the next day.
Then again, if you don’t have the time, tools, or inclination to do your own plumbing repairs, you can hire a pro. A plumber can handle nearly any problem that involves pipes, from replacing a garbage disposal to unclogging a bathtub drain, but, if your problem is a stopped-up drain, you’re usually better off calling a drain-clearing service because these are generally less expensive.
"Beginning to end of experience was fantastic! Initial service agent who took my call was friendly and personable. Got me set up for an appointment same day — on a Saturday — no extra charge. And boom, two hours later, Nelson showed up. Nelson listened intentfully, got the picture/scope, got us our quote and we were off to the races. Courteous, fast, clean, insightful, and professional. Thanks, Nelson! "

"lead hung on a string to show the vertical line," early 14c., from Old French *plombe, plomee "sounding lead," and directly from Late Latin *plumba, originally plural of Latin plumbum "lead (the metal), lead ball; pipe; pencil," a word of unknown origin, related to Greek molybdos "lead" (dialectal bolimos) and perhaps from an extinct Mediterranean language, perhaps Iberian.
Staying focused on the path set before him, Tyler continues to master the plumbing industry alongside his father (and our company’s founder), Keith Hildebrant. Choosing to partner with our company means you get to take part of something greater than just ordinary plumbing repair. You receive heartfelt customer service from a team that is committed to old-school values and gospel-led service.
Clear the trap: If the above methods do not work, the next step would be to remove the P-trap under the sink. Place a bucket underneath the area to catch water then unscrew the two threaded caps that hold the curved section of the pipe in place. Nowadays, most kitchen drains are made of white PVC pipe with connections that can be unscrewed by hand.
Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[26] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[27]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[28] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[29] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[28] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[30][31]
“Don’t go to the Yellow Pages to find a plumber,” says Berkey’s Bill Stevens. “It’s like guessing lottery numbers. Anyone can make an appealing ad, but that doesn’t mean they are legitimate. In this industry, it’s easy for a plumber who develops a poor reputation to advertise under a different name. They come and go.” Even searching for someone online may end up being a scam using fake reviews. Instead, look for a plumber who is well-established in your community. Check the Better Business Bureau and read customer reviews at sites such as HomeAdvisor, Angie’s List, or Citysearch. Local contractors or plumbing fixture stores can also refer you to a quality plumber, according to Grady Daniel, who owns a plumbing company in Austin, Texas. “Most of these firms won’t work with bad plumbers.” Or simply ask your neighbors for a referral. A trusted plumber that consistently delivers quality service does not remain a secret for very long.

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