The thicknesses of the water pipe and tube walls can vary. Pipe wall thickness is denoted by various schedules or for large bore polyethylene pipe in the UK by the Standard Dimension Ratio (SDR), defined as the ratio of the pipe diameter to its wall thickness. Pipe wall thickness increases with schedule, and is available in schedules 20, 40, 80, and higher in special cases. The schedule is largely determined by the operating pressure of the system, with higher pressures commanding greater thickness. Copper tubing is available in four wall thicknesses: type DWV (thinnest wall; only allowed as drain pipe per UPC), type 'M' (thin; typically only allowed as drain pipe by IPC code), type 'L' (thicker, standard duty for water lines and water service), and type 'K' (thickest, typically used underground between the main and the meter). Because piping and tubing are commodities, having a greater wall thickness implies higher initial cost. Thicker walled pipe generally implies greater durability and higher pressure tolerances.
One of the most critical systems of your home is the plumbing system that smoothly carries water throughout your home—when everything is working. When you have a clogged drain, leaky faucet, broken washing machine, standstill sump pump, a malfunctioning garbage disposal, a cracked sink, or an overflowing toilet, you need a plumber. Preferably, you need an experienced, local plumber who knows exactly what they’re doing. Even when nothing’s broken or going wrong, keeping your kitchen and bath areas well-maintained and in good repair can help improve your home’s value—not to mention add to your enjoyment of living there. Keeping up with the maintenance and adding upgrades, such as replacing a sink, faucet, showerhead, toilet, or bathtub liner or wall surround, however, can be technically difficult and overwhelming, and that’s where Amazon.com Plumbing Services, and the plumbers that list there, comes in.

Wooden pipes were used in London and elsewhere during the 16th and 17th centuries. The pipes were hollowed-out logs, which were tapered at the end with a small hole in which the water would pass through.[16] The multiple pipes were then sealed together with hot animal fat. They were often used in Philadelphia,[17] Boston, and Montreal in the 1800s, and built-up wooden tubes were widely used in the USA during the 20th century. These pipes, used in place of corrugated iron or reinforced concrete pipes, were made of sections cut from short lengths of wood. Locking of adjacent rings with hardwood dowel pins produced a flexible structure. About 100,000 feet of these wooden pipes were installed during WW2 in drainage culverts, storm sewers and conduits, under highways and at army camps, naval stations, airfields and ordnance plants.


Hello I had a plumber do an estimate for me to replace our copper pipes with plastic as we have no existing walls up in our basement yet...pretty basic job... so we figured we could upgrade as we do live in Northern Ontario and it does tend to get quite cold here in the winters.  We dont have any existing problems with our plumbing right now just figured it would be good time to do the job and perhaps change the pipes to 3 quarter inch for faster flow.  Well I never thought in all my life I would get an estimate back that would state $350.00 an hour in labor...yes that is correct $350.00 an hour...estimated 10 hours for the job to be completed.  So he quoted me $3500.00 for labor alone.. not supplies?  Well needless to say I will be happy with my half inch copper pipes and will happily wait for my bathtub to fill up at a slower pace.  Just wanted to know what your thoughts are on this $350.00 an hour quote?  Thank you and enjoy your day.

When you book an affordable plumber, whether it's to fix a broken boiler or to unclog a drain, you want to know they're skilled enough for the task at hand. Nothing is worse than sending an amateur with a wrench to look at your pipes. Odds are, there will be more damage than when they started. All plumbers on the Handy platform are vetted, verified, and background checked way before they arrive at your home, so you can be sure that they're the right person for the job. 


“Don’t go to the Yellow Pages to find a plumber,” says Berkey’s Bill Stevens. “It’s like guessing lottery numbers. Anyone can make an appealing ad, but that doesn’t mean they are legitimate. In this industry, it’s easy for a plumber who develops a poor reputation to advertise under a different name. They come and go.” Even searching for someone online may end up being a scam using fake reviews. Instead, look for a plumber who is well-established in your community. Check the Better Business Bureau and read customer reviews at sites such as HomeAdvisor, Angie’s List, or Citysearch. Local contractors or plumbing fixture stores can also refer you to a quality plumber, according to Grady Daniel, who owns a plumbing company in Austin, Texas. “Most of these firms won’t work with bad plumbers.” Or simply ask your neighbors for a referral. A trusted plumber that consistently delivers quality service does not remain a secret for very long.

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